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Tuesday, February 23

  1. page Still, You Feed Us Lies edited ... Humans have been battling for control since the beginning of time, and there comes a point in …
    ...
    Humans have been battling for control since the beginning of time, and there comes a point in every person's life when they are not on top and must choose between trusting authority and rebelling. Whether it is parents, teachers, law enforcement, or government officials, these authority figures supposedly know what is best for everyone. Sometimes, though, trusting authority can do more harm than good when civil rights are ignored in the name of security or dignity. In a world full of paranoia and dishonesty among civilians, people often turn to their governments as means of making everything all right. And their governments turn to the people as means of covering up their mistakes. In 1984, those who are apart of the Inner Party are the regulators of the Thought Police and Ingsoc who keep members of the Outer Party under close supervision. “Big Brother” is their leader. (“Dallmeier”) <BIG BROTHER IMAGE> Ultimately, they are protecting and being protected against information. Because of that, the security is psychological and surreal. If someone knows too much, then that person gets vaporized. In other words, the people with so-called corrupted thoughts in their heads (thoughtcrime) and passion for anything other than Big Brother will cease to exist because they are considered a threat. The government does not like a threat. Winston knows that the telescreens are always there, watching him: "He thought of the telescreen with its never-sleeping ear. They could spy upon you night and day but if you kept your head you could still outwit them," (Orwell, 1984, Chapter 2 Section 7) and he accepts there is nothing that can be done about them. This is NOT fictitious. Statistics show that the average person on the streets in Britain is caught on surveillance cameras 300 times a day, mostly without the person's knowledge. (“CCTV”) People accept it, though, because it is keeping them "safe." In Little Brother, the security is a bit different in objective, but no different in extremity. The Department of Homeland Security is there to protect against terrorism, not necessarily information, like in 1984. In this society, the danger is physical, and the security is technological. Still, Marcus points out that there is a point where security can be worse than what the security is trying to protect, saying, "They showed that universal surveillance was more dangerous than terrorism," (Doctorow, Little Brother, 75) because if every single person is constantly watched and constantly under supervision, no advancements can be made on those that are actually dangerous. He then brings up the paradox of the false positive:
    "In a city of twenty million like New York, … Maybe ten of them [are terrorists] at the outside. … One twentythousandth of a percent. … say you've got some software that can … catch terrorists 99 percent of the time. In a pool of twenty million people, a 99 percent accurate test will identify two hundred thousand people as being terrorists. … To catch ten bad guys, you have to haul in and investigate two hundred thousand innocent people. Guess what? Terrorism tests aren't anywhere close to 99 percent accurate. More like 60 percent accurate. Even 40 percent accurate, sometimes." (Doctorow, Little Brother, 46)
    ...
    be cautious?
    "You depend on our protection, yet you feed us lies from the tablecloth ... Hangers sitting in dripped oil, crying "freedom!" ... Handed to obsoletion, still you feed us lies from the tablecloth ... Blast off, it's Party time, and we don't live in a fascist nation ... Why don't presidents fight the war? Why do they always send the poor? ... Crying, "freedom!" ... Still you feed us lies ... They always send the poor."
    B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Bombs) - System Of A Down ("Tankian")
    Lyrics found at ("Muzac")

    (view changes)
    11:50 am
  2. 11:23 am

Monday, February 22

  1. page Still, You Feed Us Lies edited DISCLAIMER: The song in this video is NOT censored. I apologize if it offends anybody, it is not …
    DISCLAIMER:
    The song in this video is NOT censored. I apologize if it offends anybody, it is not my music and therefore I had no right to alter it.

    SAME EXACT TEXT IN VIDEO:
    Humans have been battling for control since the beginning of time, and there comes a point in every person's life when they are not on top and must choose between trusting authority and rebelling. Whether it is parents, teachers, law enforcement, or government officials, these authority figures supposedly know what is best for everyone. Sometimes, though, trusting authority can do more harm than good when civil rights are ignored in the name of security or dignity. In a world full of paranoia and dishonesty among civilians, people often turn to their governments as means of making everything all right. And their governments turn to the people as means of covering up their mistakes. In 1984, those who are apart of the Inner Party are the regulators of the Thought Police and Ingsoc who keep members of the Outer Party under close supervision. “Big Brother” is their leader. (“Dallmeier”) <BIG BROTHER IMAGE> Ultimately, they are protecting and being protected against information. Because of that, the security is psychological and surreal. If someone knows too much, then that person gets vaporized. In other words, the people with so-called corrupted thoughts in their heads (thoughtcrime) and passion for anything other than Big Brother will cease to exist because they are considered a threat. The government does not like a threat. Winston knows that the telescreens are always there, watching him: "He thought of the telescreen with its never-sleeping ear. They could spy upon you night and day but if you kept your head you could still outwit them," (Orwell, 1984, Chapter 2 Section 7) and he accepts there is nothing that can be done about them. This is NOT fictitious. Statistics show that the average person on the streets in Britain is caught on surveillance cameras 300 times a day, mostly without the person's knowledge. (“CCTV”) People accept it, though, because it is keeping them "safe." In Little Brother, the security is a bit different in objective, but no different in extremity. The Department of Homeland Security is there to protect against terrorism, not necessarily information, like in 1984. In this society, the danger is physical, and the security is technological. Still, Marcus points out that there is a point where security can be worse than what the security is trying to protect, saying, "They showed that universal surveillance was more dangerous than terrorism," (Doctorow, Little Brother, 75) because if every single person is constantly watched and constantly under supervision, no advancements can be made on those that are actually dangerous. He then brings up the paradox of the false positive:
    (view changes)
    9:02 pm
  2. page home edited Melanie Smith English 9 Honors Period 2 February 22, 2010 To answer the questions, "What…
    Melanie
    Smith English 9 Honors
    Period 2
    February 22, 2010

    To answer the questions, "What have(n't) we learned?" and "Where are we going?" you have to really dig deep. You have to look at society from the outside, take in all the factors, take out all the bias, and think. This is what I - a high school freshman writing a paper for an English class - came to.
    On the left navigation are all the links to each part of the paper. Obviously, you want to start at the top and work your way down. Or not, but that might be confusing. Ready set go!
    (view changes)
    12:10 pm
  3. page home edited To answer the questions, "What have(n't) we learned?" and "Where are we going?"…
    To answer the questions, "What have(n't) we learned?" and "Where are we going?" you have to really dig deep. You have to look at society from the outside, take in all the factors, take out all the bias, and think. This is what I - a high school freshman writing a paper for an English class - came to.
    ...
    be confusing. Enjoy! Ready set go!
    (view changes)
    7:31 am
  4. page home edited ... - a high school freshman writing On the left navigation are all the links to each part of …
    ...
    - a high school freshman writing
    On the left navigation are all the links to each part of the paper. Obviously, you want to start at the top and work your way down. Or not, but that might be confusing. Enjoy!
    (view changes)
    7:31 am

Sunday, February 21

  1. page home edited To answer the questions, "What have(n't) we learned?" and "Where are we going?"…
    To answer the questions, "What have(n't) we learned?" and "Where are we going?" you have to really dig deep. You have to look at society from the outside, take in all the factors, take out all the bias, and think. This is what I - a freshman writing a paper for an English class - came to.
    On the sideleft navigation are all
    ...
    part of it.the paper. Obviously, you
    (view changes)
    9:43 pm
  2. page home edited ("Reznor") Taken from Nine Inch Nails' “Every Day Is Exactly Same”, these lyrics portr…
    ("Reznor")
    Taken from Nine Inch Nails' “Every Day Is Exactly Same”, these lyrics portray an apathetic yet eerie message of how even though no one really knows how society came to be
    To answer the way it is, they can guess at where it could be leading. Despite the warnings, despite the signs,questions, "What have(n't) we learned?" and despite the potential consequences, society has not learned. The books 1984 by George Orwell ("Orwell") and Cory Doctorow's Little Brother ("Doctorow")"Where are depictions of what could be and what society is heading towards; it is a frightening future. They show that members of societywe going?" you have not learned how to think independently, when notreally dig deep. You have to trust those of authority, how to use technology properly, and that if this does not change thenlook at society from the world is headed for a disconcerting place run by machines and manipulation.
    What is the point
    outside, take in thinking for oneself if someone else is there to think for them? As government, media, and crowd mentality gains more power, there becomes less independent thought - meaning less rebellion, less corruption, and less problems... right? Well, George Orwell and Cory Doctorow do not think this is effective or ethical, and they are not alone. As people wander through life seeking acceptance, sometimes it is simply easier to conform, to go with the masses and be a follower. And then sometimes, there is no choice but to be a follower. In 1984, part of the Party's daily routine is to gather and participate in "Two Minutes Hate":
    ("Kneale")
    Winston comments, “The horrible thing about the Two Minutes Hate was not that one was obliged to act a part, but, on the contrary, that it was impossible to avoid joining in,” (Orwell, 1984, Chapter 1 Section 1) and yet he partakes in it regardless of realizing how manipulative it is.This is similar to today’s society, which Mindless Self Indulgence touches upon in their song “Mark David Chapman”:
    ("Urine")
    The lyrics read, “Indistinguishable from one another, no possible intention to even bother. It doesn’t matter what is said, or how we say it. Coincidentally, we
    all sound exactly the same,” because everyone does sound exactly the same. As government gets a hold of media outlets, and media outlets find more ways to spread information, it becomes virtually impossible to not be exposed to exactly what they want people to be exposed to. That being said, people begin to lose their principles as they get sucked into “the in crowd”, just like during Two Minutes Hate.Often, it is less of a hassle to swim with the current rather than against, as Marcus, the main character in Little Brother, pointsfactors, take out with, “It was a big crowd and we weren’t allowed to move freely through it,” (Doctorow, Little Brother, 124) when he and his friends are stuck and trying to get away. Furthermore, some people even recognize when they are being a follower, but do not or cannot change it, which is shown in both 1984 and Little Brother. Winston, the main character in 1984, rebels for as long as possible until the all-knowing telescreens catch him and break him down. Marcus also gathers people, the Xnetters, in hopes of bringing down the Department of Homeland Security, only to barely escape alive. Even then, all of those Xnetters are following Marcus, who insists that he is not meaning to lead. Society has not learned how to think separately, but instead, they have learned how to follow blindly with ignorance and acceptance without batting an eyelash.
    SAME EXACT TEXT IN VIDEO:
    Humans have been battling for control since
    the beginning of time,bias, and there comes a point in every person's life when they are not on top and must choose between trusting authority and rebelling. Whether it is parents, teachers, law enforcement, or government officials, these authority figures supposedly know what is best for everyone. Sometimes, though, trusting authority can do more harm than good when civil rights are ignored in the name of security or dignity. In a world full of paranoia and dishonesty among civilians, people often turn to their governments as means of making everything all right. And their governments turn to the people as means of covering up their mistakes. In 1984, those who are apart of the Inner Party are the regulators of the Thought Police and Ingsoc who keep members of the Outer Party under close supervision. “Big Brother” is their leader. (“Dallmeier”)<BIG BROTHER> Ultimately, they are protecting and being protected against information. Because of that, the security is psychological and surreal. If someone knows too much, then that person gets vaporized. In other words, the people with so-called corrupted thoughts in their heads (thoughtcrime) and passion for anything other than Big Brother will cease to exist because they are considered a threat. The government does not like a threat. Winston knows that the telescreens are always there, watching him: "He thought of the telescreen with its never-sleeping ear. They could spy upon you night and day but if you kept your head you could still outwit them," (Orwell, 1984, Chapter 2 Section 7) and he accepts there is nothing that can be done about them.think. This is NOT fictitious. Statistics show that the average person on the streets in Britain is caught on surveillance cameras 300 times a day, mostly without the person's knowledge. (“CCTV”) People accept it, though, because it is keeping them "safe." In Little Brother, the security is a bit different in objective, but no different in extremity. The Department of Homeland Security is there to protect against terrorism, not necessarily information, like in 1984. In this society, the danger is physical, and the security is technological. Still, Marcus points out that there is a point where security can be worse than what the security is trying to protect, saying, "They showed that universal surveillance was more dangerous than terrorism," (Doctorow, Little Brother, 75) because if every single person is constantly watched and constantly under supervision, no advancements can be made on those that are actually dangerous. He then brings up the paradox of the false positive:
    "In
    I - a city of twenty million like New York, … Maybe ten of them [are terrorists] at the outside. … One twentythousandth offreshman writing a percent. … say you've got some software that can … catch terrorists 99 percent of the time. In a pool of twenty million people, a 99 percent accurate test will identify two hundred thousand people as being terrorists. … To catch ten bad guys, you have to haul in and investigate two hundred thousand innocent people. Guess what? Terrorism tests aren't anywhere close to 99 percent accurate. More like 60 percent accurate. Even 40 percent accurate, sometimes." (Doctorow, Little Brother, 46)
    The “false positive” is downright alarming. The government has formulated a way of making people believe that what they are doing is valid, that what they are doing makes sense
    paper for an English class - came to.
    On
    the good of the people. The “false positive” is something that not many citizens would know about, thereforeside are not concerned about. In a democratic society, becauseall the people elect the government, it is difficultlinks to have justified complaints about their actions. But that is rather unfair when the government begins stripping rights and violating the constitution in the nameeach part of what they think is right. Not only that, but governments are notorious for lying and keeping mistakes under wraps in order to save themselves, and save the faith that the people have in them so that they can keep their power. This is blatantly obvious in 1984, when the government tells the people that they are at war with Eastasia, only to suddenly say that they had been at war with Eurasia instead: “Oceania was at war with Eurasia. Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia,” (Orwell, 1984, Chapter 3 Section 6) is what they convince themselves over and over again. In Little Brother, what is reported in newspapers about the incident in the park – where the police gassed the concertgoers with pepper spray – makes the police look like good guys, despite the fact that from Marcus’ perspective, they were out of line. Going back in history, there have been many situations where the government has lied to the people; from dictator Saddam Hussein in Iraq to impeached President Nixon of America to Adolf Hitler in Germany. And yet, the people under these governments have not learned to be skeptical and to not trust everything they are told. Why, though? Is it so hard to be cautious?
    ("Eskmo")
    There is no denying that technology is man’s best friend. But as technology gets more advanced, it is as if the people using it get impeded. The argument that guns, bullets, and bombs are technology could be made, but if the guy behind the weapon does not know how to use it, then he will blow himself to pieces. What that means is if society continues to let the machines get ahead of the people using them, then they are destined for disaster. The technology that exists in 1984 is frighteningly invasive, but still so normal to the Party members. With hidden cameras and hidden microphones, a machine controls every move, either directly or indirectly. Every person was being watched by the telescreens: “The telescreen received and transmitted simultaneously. Any sound that Winston made, above the level of a very low whisper, would be picked up by it, moreover, so long as he remained within the field of vision which the metal plaque commanded, he could be seen as well as heard,” (Orwell, 1984, Chapter 1 Section 1) and they have come to accept
    it. This is what society is heading towards: total control by technology. Thankfully, there are some people who know how to use technology to their advantage, like Marcus from Little Brother, who says, “Computers can control you or they can lighten your work – ifObviously, you want to be in charge of your machine you have to learn to write code,” (Doctorow, Little Brother, 43) when he and his friend get to work on some programming. But even then, Marcus points out that computers can be in charge sometimes. There may be those who can use technology appropriately, but finding someone who uses it in moderation would be a tricky task. The “Evolution of Man” is humorous only because it is so true:
    {evolutionofman.jpeg}
    ("Evolution")
    With computers and cell phones and radios and TVs and touchpads and online education and online careers and online lives, once the hole is dug, there is no climbing back out. The world of education – which is essentially the world where it all begins – is changing dramatically, shown in this comic:
    {rma0280l[1].jpeg} ("CartoonStock")
    It is all too easy to speed through life because of technology that people often forget to stop and think before they click. Gadgets get handier as people get lazier, microchips get smarter as people have higher expectations, and machines get greater as people get smaller. Society is getting smaller. With instant connections to anyone anywhere and instant access to information comes instant viruses and instant liabilities as well. That is the thing about data – sure, it is useful when it is needed, but because data is so easily transferable, ANY data is so easily transferable. People are relying on data and technology too much for it to be safe, and they have not learned how to stop. There is danger on the internet. There is danger in depending on bytes and a solid internet connection for every little action. If people do not slow down and take a break from their technological obsessions, then there is no doubt that society will be overrun by machines.
    “WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH,” (Orwell, 1984, Chapter 1 Section 1) is the Party’s slogan from 1984. It shows how man is spiraling. Society is self-destructive, nothing more and nothing less. Some people may look
    start at 1984 and think, “that is not us, that will never be us!” but the reality of it is, that yes, it is, or it has been, or it will be. There is rarely a time when the world is not involved in war,top and yet so many sit at home in peace. War for one person is peace for another. And since there is no such thing as total freedom, one might as well say that freedom is slavery. Every person is a slave to society’s destruction. Every person is ignorant, too. Newton’s third law states that with every action comes and equal and opposite reaction – as the majority become more ignorant and submissive, there are those that use the ignorance to their advantage. It gives them strength. That is today. But the future is scary as well. It is dark and unknown. It is paranoid. The future is having microchips implanted into every individual’s hand, complete with active GPS and information about that person for anyone on Web 2.0 to access. And that data will be forever. Good thing too, because there will be no such thing as “life expectancy” as all of the major diseases will have cures, cars will be unable to crash due to fancy censors in the bumpers that stop the car, and failing organs will all be replaced with no problem. People may as well plan on living forever. Even so, it would not be a big deal if someone did die - no one would have work anymore or have any “skills”; the computers will do everything. The computers will be so smart that they will not need humans to even operate them. In fact, humans will be pretty useless. Since they will not need to work, they will not need to learn about anything. And as George Santayana said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,” so is inevitable that the terrors society once endured will occur again. So, everyone will simply believe everything they are told and live happily ever after in their own heads, going along with “whatever” because no one will stand up to say they should do differently. There is nothing to stop this from happening, and no one is to say that it will not. War is peace, freedom is slavery, and ignorance is strength. Yes, the battle for man’s life is, indeed, so brief.
    Alas, though some wish it were otherwise, society has still not learned how to think as an individual, when is the right time to trust authority, how to use technology, and to look toward what humanity is bound for – lots of gadgets and government. No matter how often people tell themselves that they are “unique” and that they think for themselves, society has come to the point where no one can help
    your way down. Or not, but become sucked into the majority. That goes along with the horrid, imperceptive confidence in jurisdiction fueled by personal fear. Sadly, nobody thinks twice that maybe the government is to fear instead, so they take comfort in what they are told and leave it at that. And speaking of benighted belief, people also trust their machines more than they should, without realizing what that could lead to. It will lead to the machines moving above the people, controlling them. People willmight be so dependent on technology to the point where it is life or death. So, who can remember how this got started? Will it ever end?confusing. Enjoy!
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    9:42 pm
  3. page space.menu edited ... We're All Scared of the Future The End Credit
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    We're All Scared of the Future
    The End
    Credit
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    9:39 pm
  4. page Credit edited And it would not have happened without... "CartoonStock." Cartoon. CartoonStock. Web. …
    And it would not have happened without...
    "CartoonStock." Cartoon. CartoonStock. Web. Feb. 2010. <http://www.cartoonstock.com/>.
    ...
    it Work?" BBC BBC News World
    ...
    Digital image. Dallmeierart. Dallmeierart. 2003. Web.
    ...

    Doctorow, Cory. Little Little Brother. Tor
    ...
    Antiserum Remix)." B.A.D. B.A.D. (Bay Area
    ...
    Digital image. Naute. Naute. Web. Feb.
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    Rec. 2006. 10,000 10,000 Days. Tool.
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    Fall 2006. Ghost Ghost Opera. Kamelot.
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    "Nineteen Eighty-Four." Nineteen Nineteen Eighty-Four. Dir.
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    Rec. 2003. Music Music as a
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    Rec. 2000. Holy Holy Wood (In
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    "B.Y.O.B. Lyrics." Song Song Meanings. Web.
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    Feb. 2005. Silent Silent Alarm. Bloc
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    Orwell, George. 1984. 1984. New York:
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    Jordan Hastings. Crisis. Crisis. Alexisonfire. 2006.
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    Apr. 2006. With With Teeth. Nine
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    Rec. 1992. Turn Turn Loose the
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    Aug. 2005. Mezmerize. Mezmerize. System of
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    Jukka Nevalainen. Once. Once. Nightwish. Tuomas
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    Apr. 2008. If. If. Mindless Self
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